545 results
 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

FAO Agriculture and Fair Trade in Pacific Island Countries. This desk study has been prepared by Winnie Fay Bell and comments were kindly provided by the Pacific Regional Organic Task Force in May 2009

 SPREP Climate Change Resilience (CCR)

End of Internship presentation on Pacific Climate Finance. Section are: climate finance challenges, overview of climate finance in the Pacific, and next steps.

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme
 Environment and Conservation division

ESMS for the GCF Enhanced Direct Access Programme “Climate change adaptation solutions for local authorities in the Federated States of Micronesia”

 Department of Environment, Climate Change & Emergency Management (DECEM), FSM
 Department of Environment, Climate Change & Emergency Management (DECEM), FSM

The Federated States of Micronesia- National Communication 

Prepared Under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme

"Comparison of the average hard coral cover between the three five-year periods comprising the last 15 years (2005-09, 2010-14, 2015-19, Tab. 9.3) indicated that there was a high degree of confidence (93%) in the long-term decline, despite the uncertainty in individual yearly estimates. Further, the vast majority (90%) of this decline occurred between 2010-14 and 2015-19, suggesting that the rate of decline in hard coral cover has accelerated during the last five years"

 SPREP

In the 30th SPREP meeting held in September this year, the meeting supported the scaling up of environment data management in the Pacific and directed the Secretariat to initiate a process for developing a full-sized project proposal to support the scaling up environmental data management work in the region.

Later in October,  the Inform Project participating countries collectively agree on the need to scale up and extend the Inform Project services beyond 2022.

 SPREP

In the 30th SPREP meeting held in September this year, the meeting supported the scaling up of environment data management in the Pacific and directed the Secretariat to initiate a process for developing a full-sized project proposal to support the scaling up environmental data management work in the region.

Later in October,  the Inform Project participating countries collectively agree on the need to scale up and extend the Inform Project services beyond 2022.

 National Fisheries Authority of Papua New Guinea
 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme
 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

The Pacific Network for Environmental Assessment (PNEA) Portal is an initiative of the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) to support government officials from Pacific Island countries and territories who work with environmental impact assessment (EIA), strategic environmental assessment (SEA) as well as Environmental and Social Safeguards (ESS). 

The portal complements SPREP’s current capacity building program for EIA and SEA - including the recently launched Regional EIA Guidelines, the Coastal Tourism EIA guidelines, and SEA guidelines.

 

 Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP)

This dataset summarised a few key findings of the FSM State of Environment Report 2018 in interactive graphs.

In 2016, most of the 54,000 ha of forest in FSM was tropical lowland rainforest

 

 Department of Environment, Climate Change & Emergency Management (DECEM), FSM

Millennium Development Goals and Status Report 2010 of Federated States of Micronesia

 Smithsonian Institution

The shorefishes of Ouvea, an isolated atoll in the Loyalty Islands group of New Caledonia, had not been surveyed prior to 1990. An extensive survey was conducted by ORSTOM between 1991 and 1992 to obtain baseline information on the shorefishes. A
total of 653 taxa among 72 families are now documented from this area. The most diverse families are the Labridae (69 species), Pomacentridae (58 species), Gobiidae (54 spccies),Serranidae (39 species), Chaetodontidae (31 species) and Apogonidae (28

 The Smithsonian Institution

From 0900 on 17 June to 0615 on 19 June 1965 Caroline Atoll was visited by a field party from the Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program (POBSP) of the Smithsonian Institution. The field party, led by Sibley, collected and made observations on vascular plants, fish, reptiles, mammals, and birds. All islands with the exception of the northern two-thirds of Nake were visited. Prior knowledge of the biota of Caroline Atoll is very scant, deriving almost entirely from the visits of F. D. Bennett in 1835, Devoy in 1875, and the U.S.S. Hartford in 1883.

 The Nature Conservancy

This socio-economic study was conducted in six villages in Kimbe Bay and was part of a larger project being undertaken by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to understand the physical and biological aspects of marine ecosystems of Kimbe Bay and the socioeconomic issues influencing local marine resource use and conservation. The Kimbe Bay project aims to protect and conserve the biodiversity and marine resources of the marine environment from the pressures of population increase and economic development within the Bay.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

2xpdf
 International Organizations for Migration

As early as 1990 the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) noted that the greatest single impact of climate change might be on human migration—with millions of people displaced by shoreline erosion, coastal flooding and agricultural disruption.3 Since then, successive reports have argued that environmental degradation, and in particular climate change, is poised to become a major driver of population displacement—a crisis in the making.

Available online

Call Number: [EL]

Physical Description: 64 p.

 SPREP Pacific Environment Information Network (PEIN)

In most tropical countries, coral reef ecosystems provide coastal populations with a number of goods and services. However, a variety of anthropogenic practices threatens reef health and therefore jeopardizes the benefits flowing from these goods and services. These threats range from local pollution, sedimentation, destructive fishing practices and coral mining, to global issues such as coral bleaching.

 International Union for Nature Conservation (IUCN)

The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is one of the global conventions on environmental conservation that came out of the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. By signing and ratifying the CBD, countries have agreed to support its goals and aims. The three main objectives of the CBD are the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components, and the fair